Archive for April, 2013

So many people have said to me, “I could never paint watercolor! It is so hard to work with.”  I couldn’t disagree more.  While I understand that there is a delicate balance between water and color, or pigment, I absolutely love the way it moves, the surprises and elements of happy accidents can give you a new direction or even an end result that is absolutely delightful.  While I also paint with acrylic and pastel (I love those too), watercolor came  first for me once I transitioned from pencil to paint!

Some qualities I particularly enjoy are watching how different pigments work together..or don’t. Learning that balance between  water and pigment, and how to manipulate it is a forever learning experience.  How the pigment suspends, or breaks down it water.  Some pigments, like Antwerp Blue, actually seem to run to the water, seeking it out.  I love the transparent colors and demonstrating the differences between transparent and opaque colors.  It’s a dance.

When I’m working with acrylic, I actually use it in very much the same methods as I do with watercolor…in layered glazes. I use water with the acrylic to help it move (mostly because I’m addicted to the movement of watercolor) but have to be careful not to use too much water or it breaks down the color too much.

But this is a discussion of watercolor.  It’s really important to know your colors.  Know what they are like full strength and how they “grade” down to their lightest light.  Know what colors mix well and what shades result.  What colors are complementary?  Your color wheel can help with that, and I use other tools too.  Check out the video below and I’ll show you some very handy tools you can use to really get familiar with the colors in your palette.  There is more to read after the video, so don’t go away just yet!

So, now that you’ve seen the video, here is the secret.  Creating those charts was not my idea.  It came from the most valuable book I ever purchased on the topic of Watercolor: “The Watercolor Painter’s Pocket Palette” by Moira Clinch.  Click on the ad to buy it from Amazon sellers. And, till next time, happy painting!


So many people have said to me, “I could never paint watercolor! It is so hard to work with.”  I couldn’t disagree more.  While I understand that there is a delicate balance between water and color, or pigment, I absolutely love the way it moves, the surprises and elements of happy accidents can give you a new direction or even an end result that is absolutely delightful.  While I also paint with acrylic and pastel (I love those too), watercolor came  first for me once I transitioned from pencil to paint!

Some qualities I particularly enjoy are watching how different pigments work together..or don’t. Learning that balance between  water and pigment, and how to manipulate it is a forever learning experience.  How the pigment suspends, or breaks down it water.  Some pigments, like Antwerp Blue, actually seem to run to the water, seeking it out.  I love the transparent colors and demonstrating the differences between transparent and opaque colors.  It’s a dance.

When I’m working with acrylic, I actually use it in very much the same methods as I do with watercolor…in layered glazes. I use water with the acrylic to help it move (mostly because I’m addicted to the movement of watercolor) but have to be careful not to use too much water or it breaks down the color too much.

But this is a discussion of watercolor.  It’s really important to know your colors.  Know what they are like full strength and how they “grade” down to their lightest light.  Know what colors mix well and what shades result.  What colors are complementary?  Your color wheel can help with that, and I use other tools too.  Check out the video below and I’ll show you some very handy tools you can use to really get familiar with the colors in your palette.  There is more to read after the video, so don’t go away just yet!

So, now that you’ve seen the video, here is the secret.  Creating those charts was not my idea.  It came from the most valuable book I ever purchased on the topic of Watercolor: “The Watercolor Painter’s Pocket Palette” by Moira Clinch.  Click on the ad to buy it from Amazon sellers. And, till next time, happy painting!


So many people have said to me, “I could never paint watercolor! It is so hard to work with.”  I couldn’t disagree more.  While I understand that there is a delicate balance between water and color, or pigment, I absolutely love the way it moves, the surprises and elements of happy accidents can give you a new direction or even an end result that is absolutely delightful.  While I also paint with acrylic and pastel (I love those too), watercolor came  first for me once I transitioned from pencil to paint!

Some qualities I particularly enjoy are watching how different pigments work together..or don’t. Learning that balance between  water and pigment, and how to manipulate it is a forever learning experience.  How the pigment suspends, or breaks down it water.  Some pigments, like Antwerp Blue, actually seem to run to the water, seeking it out.  I love the transparent colors and demonstrating the differences between transparent and opaque colors.  It’s a dance.

When I’m working with acrylic, I actually use it in very much the same methods as I do with watercolor…in layered glazes. I use water with the acrylic to help it move (mostly because I’m addicted to the movement of watercolor) but have to be careful not to use too much water or it breaks down the color too much.

But this is a discussion of watercolor.  It’s really important to know your colors.  Know what they are like full strength and how they “grade” down to their lightest light.  Know what colors mix well and what shades result.  What colors are complementary?  Your color wheel can help with that, and I use other tools too.  Check out the video below and I’ll show you some very handy tools you can use to really get familiar with the colors in your palette.  There is more to read after the video, so don’t go away just yet!

So, now that you’ve seen the video, here is the secret.  Creating those charts was not my idea.  It came from the most valuable book I ever purchased on the topic of Watercolor: “The Watercolor Painter’s Pocket Palette” by Moira Clinch.  Click on the ad to buy it from Amazon sellers. And, till next time, happy painting!


So many people have said to me, “I could never paint watercolor! It is so hard to work with.”  I couldn’t disagree more.  While I understand that there is a delicate balance between water and color, or pigment, I absolutely love the way it moves, the surprises and elements of happy accidents can give you a new direction or even an end result that is absolutely delightful.  While I also paint with acrylic and pastel (I love those too), watercolor came  first for me once I transitioned from pencil to paint!

Some qualities I particularly enjoy are watching how different pigments work together..or don’t. Learning that balance between  water and pigment, and how to manipulate it is a forever learning experience.  How the pigment suspends, or breaks down it water.  Some pigments, like Antwerp Blue, actually seem to run to the water, seeking it out.  I love the transparent colors and demonstrating the differences between transparent and opaque colors.  It’s a dance.

When I’m working with acrylic, I actually use it in very much the same methods as I do with watercolor…in layered glazes. I use water with the acrylic to help it move (mostly because I’m addicted to the movement of watercolor) but have to be careful not to use too much water or it breaks down the color too much.

But this is a discussion of watercolor.  It’s really important to know your colors.  Know what they are like full strength and how they “grade” down to their lightest light.  Know what colors mix well and what shades result.  What colors are complementary?  Your color wheel can help with that, and I use other tools too.  Check out the video below and I’ll show you some very handy tools you can use to really get familiar with the colors in your palette.  There is more to read after the video, so don’t go away just yet!

So, now that you’ve seen the video, here is the secret.  Creating those charts was not my idea.  It came from the most valuable book I ever purchased on the topic of Watercolor: “The Watercolor Painter’s Pocket Palette” by Moira Clinch.  Click on the ad to buy it from Amazon sellers. And, till next time, happy painting!